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Keynote Lectures

Coverage Testing and Reliability Improvement: a Marriage of Convenience?
Antonia Bertolino, Italian National Research Council - CNR, Italy

Microservices and Enterprise SOAs: lost in translation?
Davide Rossi, University of Bologna, Italy

 

Coverage Testing and Reliability Improvement: a Marriage of Convenience?

Antonia Bertolino
Italian National Research Council - CNR
Italy
 

Brief Bio
Antonia Bertolino is a Research Director of the Italian National Research Council (CNR), in Pisa. She is an internationally renowned researcher in Software Engineering, having more than 150 co-authored papers in peer-reviewed journals and conference proceedings. She investigates approaches for software and services validation, testing, and monitoring, and on these topics has worked in several national and European projects, including the most recent Learn PAd, CHOReOS, and NESSOS. Currently she serves as an Area Editor for the Elsevier Journal of Systems and Software, and as an Associate Editor of ACM Transactions on Software Engineering and Methodology, and of Springer Empirical Software Engineering. She has recently been the General Chair of the flagship ACM/IEEE Conference ICSE 2015, Florence (Italy). She serves regularly in the Program Committee of the most renowned conferences in the field of Software Engineering, such as ESEC-FSE and ICSE, and in software testing and analysis, as ISSTA and ICST.


Abstract
Software testing can be driven by different criteria, among which code coverage and usage profile are widely used.
The former aims at exercising as much as possible the program elements (e.g., the statements), the latter aims at increasing the predicted reliability in operation.
The question whether there is any correlation between these two goals remains still open.
On the other side, the relations between the two research fields are loose.
In this talk I will discuss about potential ways and benefits of combining the two testing approaches, advocating the convenience of a tighter relationship.



 

 

Microservices and Enterprise SOAs: lost in translation?

Davide Rossi
University of Bologna
Italy
 

Brief Bio
Davide Rossi, Ph.D, is a Research Associate (Assistant Professor) at the Department of Computer Science at the University of Bologna. His main research area include software engineering, coordination models and languages, process modeling, web-based collaborative platforms. He teaches/has teached graduate courses in Web Engineering, Business Process Management, Service Oriented Architectures and Software Architectures. He has been a member of the European Research Projects PageSpace (ESPRIT Open LTR project, contract number 20179) and Adapt (Shared-Cost RTD Project funded by the Information Society Technologies Programme of the European Commission under FP5). He also participated in the TAPAS project (Shared-Cost RTD Project funded by the Information Society Technologies Programme of the European Commission under FP5). He spent 6 month as visiting scientist at the Computer Science Department of the Yale University. He is the author of more than fifty published contributions in the form of journal articles, international conference/workshop proceedings papers and book chapters.


Abstract
While today’s IT social media presence is dominated by microservices and REST-based APIs (with increasing competition from GraphQL), Service Oriented Architectures implemented on top of SOAP continue to be featured in many B2B projects and reports of their death have been greatly exaggerated.
In fact, for the most part, microservices have not replaced enterprise SOAs, but have eased a new, much wider audience, into embracing (web) services-based solutions. An audience for which the multilayered XML-based machinery behind SOAP was perceived as intimidating (and JEE so old-fashioned). By looking at real-world examples of deployed microservices-based systems, however, it is easy to realize that, when dealing with stringent non-functional requirements, they are at least as complex as enterprise SOA solutions. Complexity is just moved around.
By taking a software engineering perspective, this talk will present a few discussion topics related to service-based architectures and non-functional software qualities. Strengths and shortcomings of microservices when facing non-trivial quality concerns will be discussed, providing a foundation on which informed decisions can be taken when designing a (service-based) software architecture.



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